Fellowships

2015-2016 Committee for the Study of Religion Fellowship

Call for Mid-Career and Dissertation Fellowship Applications on the theme of “Successful Societies”

 DEADLINE for Doctoral Student and Mid-Career Faculty Applications: Monday, March 9th at noon.

The Committee for the Study of Religion invites applications from recently tenured-faculty, CUNY doctoral students, and PhDs eligible for Postdoctoral Fellowships, who would like to participate in a research seminar on the theme successful societies.

The program consists of a regular weekly seminar on Wednesdays (12:30–2:00pm) supplemented by reading groups, occasional workshops, and conferences. This broad theme is designed to attract graduates and faculty across the broad spectrum of the humanities and social sciences, and thus weekly seminars are intended to have a definitely multidisciplinary composition. The intention is that participants will from time to time present work-in-progress papers. In previous years, work from the seminar has often been published.

Successful Societies: The annual theme (2015-2016) for the seminar series for the Committee for the Study of Religion is the analysis of religion and ‘successful societies’ and how success could be measured and explained. Various indicators have been used in the policy studies to measure ‘social wellbeing’ but they are typically organized under three main clusters of namely health, wealth and happiness. The seminar program will study how social success is translated, if at all, into personal experiences of well-being and happiness. From an anthropological and historical perspective, it is obvious that ‘happiness’ is culturally conditioned by what, following Michel Foucault, we might call ‘regimes of happiness’.

The Committee will run its Wednesday seminars and occasional workshops to explore notions of happiness and the cultural and religious frameworks within which the concept has operated. In the classical world ‘eudemonia’ was understood as personal flourishing within the context of a virtuous life within the city. This notion was developed in western Christendom although much of its classical content survived. Happiness has been further transformed by modernization. Contemporary research on young Americans suggests that happiness is defined in terms of personal consumption and sexual satisfaction. By contrast, hope and happiness in various European societies have been seriously eroded by austerity packages that have resulted in economic decline, high unemployment and the loss of life chances.

There are competing regimes of happiness. The Committee will explore how such regimes might be challenged by rapid and unexpected social change such as civil wars or economic collapse. Adopting a comparative and historical approach, we will consider how different religious traditions are connected to different notions of hope and happiness. The more difficult question is how religious traditions might be related to the conditions that make for successful social change, and to what extent the issue of cultural relativism makes such questions problematic. Religious diversity may also contribute to social conflict making the development of successful social policies difficult. The Committee will explore various attempts to resolve such difficulties through the work of John Rawls, Charles Taylor, Jurgen Habermas and others.

We thus welcome applications from faculty and doctoral candidates for whom the question of religion and successful societies figures in some significant way in their research. We are interested in scholars from any field whose thinking crosses traditional academic boundaries and whose work is empirically rich and theoretically informed.

Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar, held Wednesday afternoons. Please note:  Ability to attend seminars on Wednesday afternoons is a prerequisite of eligibility. Fellows will be expected to present their work in either the fall or spring semester. Seminars will thus include presentations by fellows, talks by visitors and readings from prescribed texts. Fellows are also expected to do their best to attend corresponding public events on the theme of successful societies that will take place throughout the year.

 

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION STUDENT FELLOWSHIP 2015-16

Applications Due: Monday, March 9th, 2015, no later than 12:00 pm

Students must be registered or on an approved leave of absence during the 2015-2016 academic year to be eligible to apply. For your application to be considered, you must be officially advanced to candidacy (level III) at the time of application.

A student holding a Graduate Center fellowship may apply for the dissertation fellowships but, if offered an award, the total funding (Graduate Assistant salary plus Dissertation Fellowship stipend) may not exceed $35,000. If the combined amount exceeds $35,000 the student will have to choose between the dissertation fellowship and the graduate assistantship.

DESCRIPTION OF DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

Applications are invited from students of the humanities and humanistic social sciences such as anthropology, religion, sociology, philosophy, political science, history, English, art history, and comparative literature who engage and transect our seminar topic. This fellowship is only open to Graduate Center doctoral candidates (i.e. you must be Level III. There are no exceptions). Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar. Please note: Ability to attend weekly Committee seminars is a prerequisite of eligibility. See Committee website for more details about the seminar theme and time for the upcoming year.

With generous support from the Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Provost’s Office, successful candidates will be granted $10,000 total for Fall 2015–Spring 2016 in return for a commitment to fully participate in the work of the Committee and in the weekly seminar. The basis for selection of participants will rest primarily on the relevance to the overall project of the work proposal submitted by applicants. In accord with the interdisciplinary aim of the program, selections will also be made with an eye to maintaining disciplinary diversity.

APPLICATION COMPONENTS

Each application must include the following:

  1. Cover sheet (click to download)
  2. Statement of applicability: In one page or less, please highlight the connection between your research and the theme.
  3. Proposal

a.) 9-page project description

Including a 150 word abstract (single-spaced at the top of the first page).
The project description should include discussion of the background, relevant literature, methodology, data, projected results, and a timeline/description indicating expected progress.

The text describing the dissertation project should be double-spaced using a 12- point font with numbered pages and a 1-inch margin.

Students are advised to keep in mind that the review committees will be composed of faculty from various disciplines. Proposals should be jargon-free and clearly written.

b.) 1-page selected bibliography
The bibliography can be single-spaced.

  1. Two-page curriculum vitae.
  2. Current Graduate Center transcript. (Students may submit the unofficial student copy that can be printed from banner.)

The application materials should be assembled as a single document in PDF in the following order:

  1. Application cover sheet
  2. Statement of applicability
  3. 9-page proposal; 1-page bibliography
  4. 2-page CV
  5. Current transcript

 

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS


The completed application must be submitted no later than Monday, March 9th, 2015
at noon. The applications are to be submitted as per the following instructions.

A) Combine the following into a single PDF document:

  1. Application cover sheet
  2. Statement of applicability
  3. 9-page proposal; 1-page bibliography
  4. 2-page CV
  5. Current transcript

Cover sheet, statement of applicability, proposal (including abstract and bibliography), curriculum vitae, and transcript.

B) Save your document using the following format: Last Name, First Name, Program

C) Email the PDF to the email address of the Committee to which you are applying:

The Committee for the Study of Religion

studyofreligion@gc.cuny.edu

 

MID-CAREER FACULTY FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION FORM 2015-16

Applications Due: Monday, March 9th, 2015, no later than 12:00 pm

DESCRIPTION OF MID-CAREER FELLOWSHIP

 Applications are invited from scholars of the humanities and humanistic social sciences such as anthropology, religion, sociology, philosophy, political science, history, English, art history, and comparative literature who engage and transect our seminar topic. With generous support from the Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Provost’s Office, successful candidates will be granted two course releases from college teaching requirements, to be distributed across the Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 semesters at their department’s discretion, in return for a commitment to fully participate in the work of the Committee and in the weekly seminar. Please refer to Committee website for seminar time and details.

The basis for selection of participants will rest primarily on the relevance to the overall project of the work proposal submitted by applicants. In accord with the interdisciplinary aim of the program, selections will also be made with an eye to maintaining disciplinary diversity. Applicants must be tenured, and preference will be given to faculty in the early stages of career development (i.e. within ten years of receiving tenure).

Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar as well as ongoing lectures and symposia. Committee seminars meet weekly and it is a condition of the fellowship that fellows leave this time free in their teaching schedules.

APPLICATION COMPONENTS

 Each application must include the following:

  1. Completed Application Form (click to download)
  1. Abstract (150 words)
  1. Project description (maximum 1500 words)

The text should preferably be formatted using a 12-point font with numbered pages and a 1-inch margin.

  1. A current curriculum vitae (maximum five pages)

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

 The completed application must be submitted no later than Monday, March 9th, 2015 at noon.

The application materials should be assembled as a single document in PDF in the following order:

  1. Application Form sheet (Signed by Executive Officer or Department Chair)
  1. Abstract (150 words)
  1. Project description (maximum 1500 words)
  1. A current curriculum vitae (maximum five pages)
  1. Save your document using the following format: Last Name, First Name, Program
  1. Email the PDF to the email address of the Committee to which you are applying:

The Committee for the Study of Religion

studyofreligion@gc.cuny.edu

 

 

 

 

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